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This outline applies to traditional undergraduates seeking baccalaureate degrees. See EMU Core requirements for associate's degrees in academic and degree information. See program-specific EMU Core requirements for leadership and organizational management, RN to BS, and accelerated second degree nursing programs within the program descriptions.

Christian Faith

  • Anabaptist Biblical Perspectives (1 course) - 3 SH
  • Christian Identity and Witness (1 course) - 3 
  • CORE 201 Life Wellness - 2  Details

Communication

  • CORE 101 Transitions - Details
  • College Writing - 3 
  • CORE 120 University Research* - 1  Details
  • WRIT 150 Speech-Exploring Voice in Vocation - Details
  • Writing Intensive designates (2 courses)

Cross-Cultural Learning

  • Cross-Cultural Social Science - 3
  • Foreign language - 3
  • Cross-Cultural designate (may be a foreign language) - 2-3 
  • Community Learning designate (1 course) 

Critical Thinking

  • Creative Arts (1 course) - 1-4
  • History (1 course) - 2-3
  • Literature (1 course) - 2-4
  • Mathematics (1 course) - 2-4
  • Natural Sciences (1 course) - 2-4
  • Senior Seminar (1 course) - 2
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (1 course) - 2-3

Total: minimum of 35 credits, plus writing intensive and community learning designated courses

*CORE 120 University Research will be taken only by those first-year students who fulfill WRIT 130 College Writing prior to enrollment at EMU. 

A course may be applied to only one EMU Core requirement, with the following exception: a course which meets an EMU Core requirement may also count as a writing intensive or community learning designate. Codes used to indicate EMU Core designate courses in the schedule of undergraduate course offerings are listed with the designate descriptions below.

Christian Faith
Students choose one Anabaptist Biblical Perspectives course and one Christian Identity and Witness course offered by the department of Bible, religion, and theology, as well as "Life Wellness" which focuses on stewardship of the body. All graduates are expected to recognize expressions of Christian approaches and Anabaptist traditions in contemporary life. Refer to the department of Bible, religion, and theology section for complete course descriptions.

Anabaptist Biblical Perspectives (AB)
In Anabaptist Biblical Perspectives courses, students will show how reading the Bible informs how we live, while exploring major practices and beliefs of Mennonites and other Anabaptists. The course must be completed through EMU.

  • ABP 101 Covenant and Community: An Introduction to the Bible 3   Details
  • ABP 201 Ethics in the Way of Jesus - 3  Details
  • *BIST 212 And the Word Became Book: History of the Bible - Details
  • *BIST 223 Four Portraits of Jesus: Reading the Gospels - Details
  • *BIST 323 Life and Letters of the Apostle Paul - Details
  • *BIST 341 Old Testament Studies - 3  Details
  • THEO 323 Biblical Theology of Peace and Justice - Details

Christian Identity and Witness (CW)
In Christian Identity and Witness courses, students will explore major practices and beliefs of Christians and analyze religious, philosophical, cultural, and economic questions from a Christian perspective. The course must be completed through EMU or by taking an approved course at another Christian college.

  • CHST 212 Introduction to Youth Ministry - Details
  • CHST 223 Spiritual Formation, Sacred Pauses - Details
  • *CHST 234 Mission in a Changing World - Details
  • CHST 312 Missiology - 3  Details
  • *CHST/HIST 365 Mennonite History and Thought - Details
  • *CHST 372 Church Leadership for Transformation - Details
  • CHST 435 Martyrs, Merchants, and Mendicants-1500 Years of the Christian Movement - Details
  • *HIST/CHST 365 Mennonite History and Thought - Details
  •  PHIL 201 Introduction to Philosophy -3  Details
  • *PHIL 212 Ways of Knowing - 3  Details
  • *PHIL 334 Moral Philosophy - 3  Details
  • *PHIL 412 Philosophy of Religion - 3  Details
  • *REL 201 Introduction to Religious Studies - Details
  • *REL 310-315 Topics in Religion - 3  Details
  • *REL 323 Contemporary Culture - 3  Details
  • *REL 423 Judaism, Christianity, Islam-Comparative Monotheisms - Details
  • THEO 201 Introduction to Theology - Details
  • *THEO 312 Topics in Christian Theology - Details
  • *THEO 412 Liberation Theologies - 3  Details

Life Wellness

  • CORE 201 Life Wellness - 2  Details

Communication
Students develop effective communication skills through a first-year writing course, an orientation and discussion course, two additional writing intensive designate courses, and speech communication.

College Writing

  • WRIT 130 College Writing - Details  
  • WRIT 140 Advanced College Writing - 3  Details   
  • WRIT 120 Introductory College Writing - Details   
  • CORE 101 Transitions - Details  
  • CORE 120 University Research - 1  Details  

These first-year courses develop academic reading, thinking, and writing skills in various discourse communities. The following are guidelines to follow for writing placement. Decisions are made on an individual basis.

  1. A student who scores 5 on the AP Language and Composition exam earns 3 hours of credit, satisfies the writing course requirement, and will enroll in CORE 120 University Research.
  2. Students who wish to meet the EMU Core writing requirement through dual enrollment writing courses may be asked to demonstrate writing and research skills equivalent to the objectives of the EMU course WRIT 130 College Writing. The following points apply to instances where a student wishes to meet the EMU Core writing requirement through dual enrollment writing courses:
    1. Students with a grade below B in their dual enrollment writing course (or in the second semester of a two-part writing sequence) will be placed in WRIT 120 or 130 based on their ACT/SAT English scores and grades in junior and senior year high school English courses.
    2. The director of the writing program may, upon review of a student's overall record, recommend that a student with a grade of B or better in dual enrollment writing enroll in a first-year writing course at EMU.
    3. The director of the writing program may request a writing sample from a student in the process of deciding which EMU writing course/s to recommend.  Additional methods for determining writing placements may be introduced as needed.
    4. Students who have satisfied the writing course requirement through dual enrollment will enroll in CORE 120 University Research.
  3. If a student takes WRIT 110, 120, or 130 two times and does not pass, the director of the writing program, in consultation with the academic deans, will provide a recommendation regarding next steps for the student to gain readiness for our writing courses.

Writing Intensive Designates (WI)
Students complete two Writing Intensive (WI) designate courses in addition to College Writing or Advanced Writing noted above. WI courses emphasize writing as a way of learning and development of the writing process. Prerequisite for all WI courses: WRIT 130 or 140.

  • ACTG 422 Intermediate Accounting III - 3  Details
  • *BIOCH 398 Advanced Cell Biology - 3  Details
  • BIOL 235 Ecology: Adaptation and Environment - 4  Details
  • BIOL 485 Faith, Science, and Ethics - 2  Details
  • *BIST 323 Life and Letters of the Apostle Paul - Details
  • BUAD 331 Organizational Behavior - 3  Details
  • CCSSC 387 Race, Space, and Inequality (WCSC) - 3  Details
  • CHST/HIST 435 Martyrs, Merchants, and Mendicants-1500 Years of the Christian Movement - 3  Details
  • CMUS 250 Music History I - 3  Details
  • CMUS 260 Music History II - 3  Details
  • *CS 365 System Administration - 2  Details
  • *CS 445 Analysis of Algorithms - 2  Details
  • *ECON 311 Contemporary Economic Issues - Details
  • *ECON 331 History of Economic Thought - Details
  • *ECON 401 Development Economics - 3  Details
  • ED 235 Curriculum and Organization in Early Education - 4  Details
  • ED 401 Examining Foundations of Education - Details
  • ENGR 325 Engineering Ethics - 2  Details
  • ENGR 491 Senior Capstone Project - 2  Details
  • ENVS 430 Environmental Sustainability Capstone - 2  Details
  • *HIST 411 The History of Recent America, 1941-Present - Details
  • HIST/CHST 435 Martyrs, Merchants, and Mendicants-1500 Years of the Christian Movement - 3  Details
  • HUM 200 Foundations of Humanities - 2  Details
  • HUM 490 Seminar in Humanities - 4  Details
  • *MATH 364 Geometry - 2  Details
  • *MKTG 410 Strategic Marketing Management - Details
  • NURS 310 Conceptual Framework of Nursing - Details
  • NURS 311 Conceptual Framework Bridge Course - Details
  • NURS 440 Transition to Practice - 3  Details
  • *PE 415 Exercise Physiology of Sport - Details
  • *PPX 371 Peace and Security in East Asia - 3  Details
  • PPX 401 Human Rights and Dignity - 4  Details
  • *PPX 421 Genocide in the 20th Century - 4  Details
  • *PPX 431 Political Reconciliation - 4  Details
  • PSYC 341 Cognitive Psychology - 3  Details
  • PSYC 472 Research in Psychology - 2  Details
  • PXD/SOC 225 Theories of Social Change - Details
  • PXD 365 Social and Political Economy - 3  Details
  • *RSM 309 Recreation and Sport Program and Event Planning - Details
  • SOC/PXD 225 Theories of Social Change - Details
  • SOC 392 Junior Seminar in Social Research - Details
  • SOWK 330 Social Policy Analysis - 3  Details
  • SOWK 400 Social Work Practice II - 3  Details
  • SPAN 320 Constructing Identities - 3  Details
  • SPAN 325 The Latino Experience - 3  Details
  • THR 360 Playwriting - 2  Details
  • *THR 361 Screenwriting - 2  Details
  • *VACA 283 Art History-Western - Details
  • WRIT 200 Introduction to Creative Writing  -Details
  • WRIT 210 News and Feature Writing - 3  Details
  • *WRIT 351 Fiction Writing Workshop - Details
  • *WRIT 352 Creative Nonfiction Workshop - Details
  • *WRIT 380 Expository Writing - Details
  • *WRIT 381 Argumentative Writing - Details
  • *WRIT 383 Professional Writing - Details

Speech: Exploring Voice in Vocation

  • WRIT 150 Speech-Exploring Voice in VocationDetails

Cross-Cultural Learning
Students complete at least 8-9 SH of cross-cultural designate courses including an experiential component (usually CCSSC 201), at least one foreign language, and an additional cross-cultural designate course which may also be a foreign language course. In addition to these cross-cultural designate hours, students also complete a community learning designate course.

Cross-Cultural Experiential Component

  • CCSSC 201 Cross-Cultural Social Science - 3  Details
  • CCSSC 202 Cross-Cultural Learning and Integration - 1  Details  (for qualifying students)
  • CCSSC 211 Cross-Cultural Community Immersion - 3  Details  (students who transfer at least 58 credits taken prior to matriculation at EMU are eligible)

For additional information on any cross-cultural offerings, students are encouraged to contact the Intercultural Programs office.

  1. Option 1: Semester Cross-Cultural Program
    The semester program is the recommended cross-cultural option. Each semester program comprises 15 SH taken as five courses. A semester cross-cultural usually includes one faith course meeting the Christian Identity and Witness (CIW) requirement and a language course (where appropriate) fulfilling the foreign language requirement. Other coursework represents history and culture, additional language studies, or an area of faculty expertise, and fulfills cross-cultural designate credit. Course work during a semester cross-cultural does not satisfy EMU Core Critical Thinking requirements. Semester cross-cultural programs scheduled for 2021-22 include:
    1. Fall 2021South Korea, China & Southeast Asia with leaders Daniel Showalter and Myrrl Byler
      1. CCSSC 201 Cross-Cultural Social Science: Southeast Asia - 3
      2. CCLNG 112 Asian Languages - 3
      3. CCHIS 315 Historical and Contemporary Issues in East and Southeast Asia - 3
      4. CCREL 313 Asian Religion and Culture (CIW) - 3
      5. CCSSC 307 Community Development in Asia - 3
    2. Spring 2022 - Guatemala with leader Laura Yoder
      1. CCSSC 201 Cross-Cultural Social Science: Guatemala - 3  Details
      2. CCREL 307 Religion in Society (CIW) - 3
      3. CCHIS 312 Latin American History and Current Issues - 3 
      4. Spanish language (two of the following courses, placement based on previous knowledge): - 6
        1. CCSPA 110 Elementary Spanish I  
        2. CCSPA 120 Elementary Spanish II  
        3. CCSPA 210 Intermediate Spanish I  
        4. CCSPA 220 Intermediate Spanish II  
        5. CCSPA 312 Adv. Conversational Spanish I 
        6. CCSPA 322 Adv. Conversational Spanish II 
  2. Option 2: Summer Cross-Cultural Seminars (3-6 weeks)
    Summer seminars provide exposure to cross-cultural contexts for 3-6 weeks. A three-week experience comprises the core experiential course. Six-week seminars include a second 3 SH course. The student elects complementary courses (see the following list of cross-cultural designates) to complete the required three cross-cultural courses. Cross-cultural seminars scheduled for summer 2022 include:
    1. New Zealand with leaders Jim and Kathy Yoder
      1. CCSSC 201 Cross-Cultural Social Science: New Zealand - 3
      2. CCENV 210 Conservation and Sustainability in New Zealand
    2. Spain with leaders Deanna Durham and Byron Peachey
      1. CCSSC 201 Cross-Cultural Social Science: Spain - 3
      2. CCSPA 110, 120, 210, 220, 312, 322, 332 - 3
    3. A Women's West with leaders Kimberly Schmidt and Su Flickinger
      1. CCSSC 201 Cross-Cultural Social Science: Native American Southwest - 3
    4. Ghana Year of Return with leaders Talibah Aquil and Celeste Thomas 
      1. CCSSC 201 Cross-Cultural Social Science: Ghana - 3
  3. Option 3: Washington Community Scholars' Center (WCSC) 
    The Washington Community Scholars' Center (WCSC) provides students a semester or 10-week summer experience exploring cultural diversity, career-building internships, and connections between faith and vocation in Washington, D.C. See the Special Programs section for more information.

Cross-Cultural Designates (CC)
The following courses may be selected as cross-cultural designates to complete the number of required courses. (Please note that students entering EMU prior to fall 2018 will need 9 SH to fulfill CC requirements unless they elect to pursue the revised Core requirements.)

  • BIOL 161 Food and Population - 3  Details
  • *BUAD 441/ECON 411 International Business/Economics - 3  Details
  • *CMUS 201 Topics in Music-World Music - 2  Details
  • *ECON 401 Development Economics - 3  Details
  • *ECON 411/BUAD 441 International Economics/Business - Details
  • ENGL 201 Global Literatures I-Beginnings - 2  Details
  • ENGL 202 Global Literatures II-1300-1650 - 2  Details
  • ENGL 203 Global Literatures III-1650-1800 - 2  Details
  • ENGL 204 Global Literatures IV-1800-Present - 2  Details
  • GEOG 231 Cultural Geography - 3  Details
  • GS 101 Introduction to Global Studies - 2  Details
  • HIST 121 Global Past I-Civilization (to 1400) - 2  Details
  • HIST 122 Global Past II-Modernization (post-1400) - 2  Details
  • HIST 123-126 Global Past III-Comparative Themes - 2  Details
  • HIST 182 The Global Past II-1500 to the Present - 3  Details
  • *HIST 251 History of Africa - 3  Details
  • *HIST 352 History of Women-Global Perspectives - Details
  • *HIST 432 History of the Middle East - 3  Details
  • *LANG 110 Elementary Arabic I - 
  • *LANG 170 Elementary German I - 3
  • LING 250 Introduction to Linguistics - 3  Details
  • LIT 230 Global Literatures III-1800 to the Present - 3  Details
  • POL 113 International Relations - 2  Details
  • *PPX 371 Peace and Security in East Asia - 3  Details
  • PXD 375 Globalization and Justice - 3  Details
  • REL 223 World Religions - 3  Details
  • SOC 334 Cultural Anthropology - 3  Details
  • SOWK 360 Race and Gender - 3  Details
  • SPAN 110 Elementary Spanish I - 3  Details
  • SPAN 120 Elementary Spanish II - 3  Details
  • SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish I - 3  Details
  • SPAN 220 Intermediate Spanish II - 3  Details
  • SPAN 231-232 Intermediate Spanish I and II for Healthcare Professionals - 6  Details
  • All 300- and 400-level SPAN courses may also serve as cross-cultural designates. 
  • All courses in semester and summer cross-culturals, including WCSC.

Other cross-cultural topics or area studies are offered periodically.

Foreign Language
Students complete at least one 3 SH course in a foreign language. Additional foreign language courses may serve as cross-cultural designates. Course offerings are linked with cross-cultural programs at EMU, and a variety of languages are offered each year. Students place into 100-, 200-, or 300-level Spanish courses based on years' experience with the language, test scores, and a placement assessment conducted the first day of class.

Note that heritage or native speakers or students that have lived in a Spanish speaking country, scored a 4 or a 5 on the AP Spanish Exam, a 5, 6, or 7 on the higher-level IB Spanish Exam (A1 or A2), or a 7 on the IB Exam (Spanish B), must enroll in a 300-level course. Please see Spanish faculty for more information on placement into Spanish courses. Testing is available through EMU Career Services for students who wish to receive credit for languages in which they are fluent. See the academic and degree information section for details about obtaining language credit through testing.

Community Learning Designates (CL)
Students complete one Community Learning (CL) designate course. CL courses integrate at least 15 hours of experiential learning in a community setting.

  • ACTG 481 Accounting Internship - 1-3  Details
  • BIOL 219 Life Science Practicum - 1  Details
  • *BIST 223 Four Portraits of Jesus: Reading the Gospels - Details
  • BUAD 461 Strategic Leadership in Organizations - Details
  • BUAD 481 Business Internship - 1-3  Details
  • *CHEM 285 Environmental Chemistry - 4  Details
  • CHST 312 Missiology - 3  Details
  • *CHST/HIST 365 Mennonite History and Thought - Details
  • CHST 451 Church Work Practicum - 3  Details
  • CHST 473 Youth Ministry Practicum - 3  Details
  • CMUS 490 Music Internship 1-2  Details
  • CS 488 Computer Science Internship - 1-3  Details
  • ECON 481 Economics Internship - 1-3  Details
  • ED 101 Exploring Teaching - Details
  • ED 252 Learning and Classroom Environments PFE (6-12) - 1  Details
  • ED 342 Reading/Diagnostic Reading - Details
  • *ENGL 344 Ways of War and Peace - Details
  • *ENGL 348 American Manhood - 3  Details
  • ENGL 470 English Internship - 1-3  Details
  • ENVS 429 Environmental Sustainability Internship - 3  Details
  • FIN 481 Finance Internship - 1-3  Details
  • *HIST/CHST 365 Mennonite History and Thought - Details
  • HIST 441 History Internship - 1-3  Details
  • HONRS 431 Honors Teaching and Leadership - 0-2  Details
  • LARTS 256 Commuter Cycling - 1  Details
  • LARTS 391 Peer Tutoring Practicum II - 1-3  Details
  • LEAD 281 Leadership Practicum - 1  Details
  • LEAD 481 Leadership Internship - 1-3  Details
  • LING 470 Linguistics Internship 1-3  Details
  • MKTG 481 Marketing Internship - 1-3  Details
  • *MUED 341 Elementary School Music - 2-3  Details
  • *MUED 342 Secondary School Music - 3  Details
  • *MUED 412 Vocal Pedagogy - 2  Details
  • *MUED 413 Piano Pedagogy - 2  Details
  • MUES 333 Chamber Ensemble - 1  Details
  • NURS 426 Nursing and the Family in the Community - Details
  • NURS 432 Community Health - 3  Details
  • PE 210 Sophomore Practicum: KES - 1  Details
  • PE 301 Adapted Physical Education - 3  Details
  • *POL 250 Law, Justice and the Local Context - Details
  • PSYC 203 Developmental Case Study - Details
  • PSYC 482, 483 Psychology Internship I and II (must enroll in 2 semesters) - Details
  • PXD 431 Peacebuilding and Development Practicum - 1-3  Details
  • RSM 211 Sophomore Recreation Practicum - Details
  • RSM 411 Senior Internship - 4  Details
  • SOC 409 Field Experience in Sociology - 3  Details
  • SOWK 101 Exploring Social Work - Details
  • SOWK 430 Senior Practicum in Social Work - 12  Details
  • SPAN 330 Immigration Issues - 3  Details
  • SPAN 360 Spanish for Health Care - 3  Details
  • SPAN 470 Internship - 1-3  Details
  • VACA 262 Video Production - 4  Details
  • *VACA 354 Conservation Photography -  Details
  • *VACA 367 Hybrid Storytelling - 4  Details
  • *VACA 397 Elementary School Art Methods - 2-Details
  • *VACA 398 Secondary School Art Methods  - Details
  • *VACA 465 Visual Storytelling-Non-Fiction - 4  Details
  • VACA 491 Internship - 1-6  Details
  • WCSC 285 Internship Theory and Practice (WCSC) - Details
  • WCSC 325 Career and Vocation (WCSC) - 2  Details
  • WRIT 470 Writing Internship - 1-3  Details

Community Learning requirements are also fulfilled by completing the clinical lab science program.

Critical Thinking
Students choose a course from each content area of Creative Arts, History, Literature, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social and Behavioral Sciences to develop critical thinking. The Senior Seminar provides opportunity for making connections throughout the undergraduate experience.

Creative Arts (CA)
Students practice creative process through experiential engagement with the arts.

  • ART 141 Drawing - 3 Details
  • *CHMUS 211 Music for the Congregation - Details
  • CMUS 114 Appreciating Music Making  - Details
  • CMUS 116 Appreciating Music Making - 2  Details
  • *CMUS 201 Topics in Music-World Music - 2  Details
  • *CMUS 202 Topics in Music-Folk Rock to Hip Hop: An Introduction to American Popular Music - Details
  • *CMUS 203 Topics in Music-Listening to Film - 2  Details
  • *CMUS 204 Topics in Music-Introduction to Music Technology - Details
  • MUED 131 Class Piano I - 1  Details
  • MUED 132 Class Piano II - 1  Details
  • *MUED 341 Elementary School Music - 2-3  Details
  • *MUED 342 Secondary School Music - 3  Details
  • MUES 310 The University Choir - 1  Details
  • MUES 321 Chamber Singers - 1  Details
  • MUES 331 Chamber Orchestra - 1  Details
  • MUES 332 Wind Ensemble - 1  Details
  • MUES 333 Chamber Ensemble - 1  Details
  • MUES 341 EMU Jazz - 1  Details
  • MUPS 121 Class Voice - 1 Details
  • MUPS 2xx, 3xx Performance Studies - 1-2  Details
  • PEM 145 Rhythmic Activities - 1  Details
  • THR 100 Acting for the Stage and Screen - 2  Details
  • THR 210 Technical Theater - 2  Details
  • THR 230-235 Topics in Theater - Details
  • THR 300 Directing for the Theater - 2  Details
  • THR 360 Playwriting - 2  Details
  • *THR 361 Screenwriting - 2  Details
  • VACA 112 Digital Photography - 3  Details
  • VACA 121 Drawing - 4  Details
  • *VACA 131 Three-Dimensional Design - 4  Details
  • VACA 141 Foundations of Design - 4  Details
  • VACA 151 Photography 1 - 2  Details
  • VACA 221 Watercolor - 3 Details
  • VACA 222 Painting - 4  Details
  • VACA 232 Ceramics - 4  Details
  • *VACA 323 Printmaking/Watercolor - 4  Details
  • *VACA 397 Elementary School Art Methods - 2-3  Details
  • WRIT 200 Introduction to Creative Writing - Details
  • *WRIT 351 Fiction Writing Workshop - Details
  • *WRIT 352 Creative Nonfiction Workshop - Details
  • *WRIT 370 Poetry Writing - Details

History (HI)
History coursework cultivates analysis and empathic learning across societies, political systems, and cultures of all times.

  • *ECON 331 History of Economic Thought - 3  Details
  • HIST 101 U.S. History I - 2  Details
  • HIST 102 U.S. History II - 2  Details
  • HIST 103 U.S. History III - 2  Details
  • HIST 121 Global Past I - 2  Details
  • HIST 122 Global Past II - 2  Details
  • HIST 123-126 Global Past III - 2  Details
  • HIST 182 Global Past II-1500 to the Present - 3  Details
  • *HIST 222 African American History - Details
  • *HIST 231 Medieval Europe  - 3   Details
  • *HIST 352 History of Women-Global Perspectives - Details
  • *SPAN 303 Dictatorships and Social Movements - Details
  • *SPAN 425 Indigenous People and Conquest - Details
  • *THR 200 Survey of World Theater History - Details

Literature (LI)
Literature coursework cultivates analysis and empathic learning across societies, political systems and cultures through texts:

  • ENGL 201 Global Literatures I - 2  Details
  • ENGL 202 Global Literatures II - 2  Details
  • ENGL 203 Global Literatures III - 2  Details
  • ENGL 204 Global Literatures IV - 2  Details
  • ENGL 210 Reading Fiction - 2   Details
  • ENGL 250 Reading Poetry - Details
  • ENGL 290-295 Topics in Literature - 2-3  Details
  • All 300-level ENGL courses
  • LIT 230 Global Literatures III-1800 to the Present -  Details
  • *SPAN 301 The Art of Storytelling - 3  Details
  • *SPAN 395 Survey of Hispanic Literature - 3  Details
  • *THR 200 Survey of World Theater History - Details

Mathematics
The mathematics requirement ensures that all students are able to communicate effectively in the numerical forms required in the liberal arts and the specific disciplines they pursue.
Students may meet the mathematics requirement in the following ways:

  • Receiving credit for any EMU course with a MATH or STAT prefix that is listed in the mathematical sciences section.
  • Receiving credit through the Advanced Placement exams in either statistics or calculus.

Natural Sciences (NS)
Natural sciences coursework emphasizes scientific inquiry as a method for learning about life. (Please note that students entering EMU prior to fall 2018 will need at least 3 SH to fulfill NS requirements unless they elect to pursue the revised Core requirements.)

  • BIOL 105 Science in Society - Details
  • BIOL 145 Nutrition Fundamentals - 2  Details
  • BIOL 155 Biological Explorations - 3  Details
  • BIOL 161 Food and Population - 3  Details
  • BIOL 173 Concepts in Biology - 4  Details
  • *BIOL/PSYC 451 Neuropsychology - 3  Details
  • CHEM 105 Chemistry for the Life Sciences - Details
  • CHEM 155 Matter and Energy - 3  Details
  • CHEM 223 General Chemistry I - 4  Details
  • ENVS 135 Earth Science - 2  Details
  • ENVS 145 Environmental Science - 2  Details
  • *ENVS 235 Sustainable Food Systems - 2  Details
  • PHYS 252/253 University Physics I/Lab - 3, 1  Details
  • *PSYC/ BIOL 451 Neuropsychology - 3  Details

Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB)
Social and behavioral sciences coursework develops problem-solving strategies by inviting students to analyze and respond to real world situations. (Please note that students entering EMU prior to fall 2018 will need at least 3 SH to fulfill SB requirements unless they elect to pursue the revised Core requirements.)

  • BUAD 221 Principles of Management - 3  Details
  • ECON 201 Survey of Economics - Details
  • ECON 211 Principles of Microeconomics - Details
  • ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics - Details
  • LEAD 300 Leadership Theory and Practice - Details
  • POL 111 Comparative Politics - 2  Details
  • POL 112 American Politics - 2  Details
  • POL 113 International Relations - 2  Details
  • PSYC 101 General Psychology - 3  Details
  • PSYC 202 Developmental Psychology - Details
  • PSYC 221 Social Psychology - 3  Details
  • PXD 151 Exploring Conflict and Peace - Details
  • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology - 3  Details
  • SOC/SOWK 210 Social Stratification - 3  Details
  • SOC 330 The Family in Social Context - 3  Details
  • SOC 375 Community Development (WCSC) - Details
  • SOWK 200 Social Behavior and Diversity - Details
  • SOWK/SOC 210 Social Stratification - 3  Details

Senior Seminar
This team-taught course provides an opportunity for students to reflect on their life journeys and synthesize their undergraduate experience as they consider their transition from EMU. The course focuses on identity formation, the process of being and becoming, and finding voice. A chosen theme frames volitional and reflective inquiry. Registration is limited to students in their final year of enrollment. Senior Seminars for 2021-22 include:

Fall 2021

  • CORE 401 Senior Seminar: Dealing with Suffering and Loss - 2 
    Everyone suffers loss at one time or another and we are often left without resources to cope when such things happen, whether that experience is what we consider insignificant loss or a more catastrophic loss. This course seeks to allow us to encounter our own experiences of suffering and loss, to learn from others' experiences, and to offer practical resources for dealing with the inevitable human experiences of hardship. The range of themes include catastrophic loss, our cross-cultural experiences, our relationships, our fears of the future and our vocation. Readings, guest lectures, an interview project and reflections on faith and spirituality will be integral parts of the course.
  • CORE 401 Senior Seminar: On Trails - 2 
    This course will explore pilgrimage and walking as a central part of the human experience. The purpose of the course is to guide students into an investigation of their past stories and their future vocations, using trails as the path to do so. The class will explore the meaning and the significance of pilgrimage through study of biblical texts, 17th century Japanese poetry, and contemporary American and European texts. The class will be experiential: Students will write, read, and tread their own texts as they explore trails in small groups and as a class. Writing and art journaling will be a significant component of the course.

Spring 2022

  • CORE 401 Senior Seminar: Navigating Digital Seas - 2 
    Our lives online present us with an overwhelming sea of information and an ever-changing array of tools to sift and sort through that information. How is that going for us? What do we know about the impact of search engines and algorithms on our lives? How do we maintain energy and drive to act with purpose when clicking "like" seems the best we can do? To what extent are our offline lives shaped by our online lives? Class discussions, science fiction, movies, interviews, and media experiments will help us focus on how we use media to find work, sustain love, and discover truth about the world.
  • CORE 401 Senior Seminar: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion - 2 
    This course will engage students in self-reflection and assessment of intercultural competency. Through books, films, class discussion and interviews students will learn from diverse narratives. Students will be introduced to strategies for prioritizing diversity, equity and inclusion in their own lives, communities, churches and workplaces. Best practices and evaluation tools will be introduced. Keeping a personal journal as well as group work will be central to successful course completion.

The following courses also fulfill the Senior Seminar requirement:

  • HONRS 401 Worldview Seminar - 2  Details
  • WCSC 485 Servant Leadership fulfills the EMU Core Senior Seminar requirement for students who have earned 90 SH prior to enrollment in WCSC.  Details
  • NURS 439 Transition to Practice (for students in the Accelerated Second Degree Nursing Program) - 3  Details

*Indicates courses offered in alternate years.


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